Easter 2014

     Easter 2014 - Public Holiday Entitlements

     Good Friday always causes confusion in terms of entitlement to time off.  We’re here to set the record straight.  Friday 18th April 2014 (Good Friday) is a normal working day and is not a Public Holiday. It may be a Bank Holiday but it is not a Public Holiday and there is no additional statutory payment due in respect of that day. 

     Easter Monday, 21st April 2014, is a Public Holiday.

     An employee is entitled to their employer's choice of the following, in respect of a public holiday:

      a)   A paid day off on that day

      b)   A paid day off within a month of that day

      c)   An additional day of annual leave

      d)   An additional day's pay.

     If an employer does not nominate one option 21 days before the holiday, the employee automatically receives a paid day off on the public holiday.

     To qualify for the Public Holiday benefit, part-time/casual employees must have worked at least 40 hours in the 5 weeks ending on the day before the public holiday. Full time employees are immediately entitled to a public holiday benefit.

     Where a public holiday falls on a day on which the employee normally works, or is normally scheduled to work, then the full time employee is entitled to one of the public holiday benefits listed above.

     Where a public holiday falls on a day on which an employee is normally off work, or is not scheduled to work, then:

    •  A full time employee is entitled to a public holiday benefit equal to 1/5th of his normal weekly pay in respect of the normal weekly hours last worked by the employee before that public holiday,
    • A part-time employee is also entitled to a public holiday benefit equal to 1/5th of his normal weekly pay, based on the average weekly pay (including any regular bonus or allowance, but excluding overtime) in the 13 weeks worked immediately prior to the public holiday, assuming they have worked 40 hours or more in the previous 5 weeks.

     Where an employee works 6 days per week and a public holiday falls on a day which he is normally scheduled to work, he is entitled to one of the benefits listed above. Where the public holiday falls on the day on which he is not normally required to work, he is still only entitled to 1/5th of his normal weekly pay, provided that the amount does not exceed the amount that the employee would have been paid if it was a day he normally worked.

     Where an employee ceases to be employed at any time during the week ending on the day before a public holiday (i.e. in the 7 day period immediately preceding the public holiday), and the employee has worked for his or her employer during the previous 4 weeks, the employee is entitled to be paid a public holiday entitlement for the public holiday, calculated at the appropriate daily rate. A part-time employee must also have satisfied the condition of having worked 40 hours in the preceding 5 week period ending on the day before the public holiday.

    As a client of PaycheckPlus, just let us know about your employees and the hours they have worked and we take it from there.

    For more details of our Outsource Payroll Services contact Niamh or Anne on +353 41 686 3000 or Request a Callback from our PayrollTeam@paycheckplus.ie.  Paycheck Plus - Making Payroll Easy!

     

     

    Topics: Blog, Good Friday, News, Public Holiday, Tip of the Month

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